Practices of Everyday Life

Fallen Fruit’s new  Site-specific installation for 21c at Proof On Main on view through 2018.

David Burns and Austin Young/Fallen Fruit, (American)

The Practices of Everyday Life, 2016

Mixed media, including wallpaper, painting, prints, and found objects

“Fallen Fruit’s immersion into the people and places that have shaped this community reveals a multitude of stories and connections in a visually dazzling and profoundly genuine expression of place making,” said Alice Gray Stites, 21c Museum’s  ground-breaking director and chief curator. “21c is proud to have commissioned an ambitious project that is truly locally engaged and globally connected. The installation addresses a universal aspect of the human condition, hunger—to be fed, to be seen, to belong, to be loved. The persistence of these desires fosters the continuity of ritual: the practices of everyday life don’t really change—we eat, drink, we talk, we congregate and celebrate in ways that would be recognizable to our forbears at least a century ago—these acts retain meaning and promise.”

David Burns and Austin Young, who work as the duo Fallen Fruit, explore and transform located geographies and narrative histories at the intersections of public and private spaces. This site-specific commission is inspired by a wide range of definitions of “the public,” from the stranger or passerby to the vast public spaces of the Internet, and includes collective histories found in native and creationist mythologies, generational knowledge, and public and private archives.

“We created a work of art in the form of an art installation at Proof on Main that celebrates people and place using source material from architectural salvage yards, historical images, personal diaries, amateur films, and ephemera from Louisville, Kentucky and Southern Indiana,” explain the artists. Constructed from dozens of individual photographs, texts, and objects, their research-based work is intended to celebrate the culture of place. The selection of each photograph, wall treatment, or object is deliberate; even the seemingly obtuse or misplaced is carefully chosen to create contrast and to explore conflicting shifts in meaning.  The artwork intimately explores the boundary of what is “public” and what is “private.” 

 At 21c, Fallen Fruit’s custom wallpaper patterns represent the spectrum of historical, environmental, and cultural characteristics of Louisville, Kentucky. The wallpaper in Proof lounge features photographs of the pear tree blossoms that line sidewalks downtown and other parts of the city. The experience of love blooms, wanes, returns, and revives in the sculptures, photographs, and other objects that constitute It Happens To Everyone Some Day / The Last “Gay” Bar In America. Images of notable citizens like Henrietta Bingham, David Williams, Stephen Irwin, and others hang beside contemporary pin ups, evoking endless tales of passion, romance, heartbreak, and inspiration.

The red dogwood blooms seen in the main dining room’s wallpaper pattern reference a Cherokee creationist myth, while the framed artworks hanging here  represent the pre-contact culture of this region prior to 18th century European settlement. Kentucky once served as a hunting ground for native cultures. Later trading posts drew in  both settlers and natives. The bison and landscape photographs were taken by the artists at Goshen County’s Woodland Farm in 2016. Taxidermy bison busts hang near the restaurant windows; their majestic features are mirrored in the pop-art portraits hanging amid photographs of forests and rivers, Native Americans, as well as historical documents, and other ephemera. The images of Native Americans come from the archives of the Library of Congress, and include 20th-century portraits for which sitters were sometimes costumed, posed, and paid to represent cultures that were already doomed  by European-American expansion.

In the west dining room, Farm To Table / 1864 to 2016 honors Kentucky’s agrarian roots, which have sustained this community for over two centuries: the space is wallpapered with images of vegetables and fruits grown at Woodland Farm, some of which are served in the restaurant.  Images of some of the complex histories about Kentucky evoke contemporary issues that persist in the United States today, including our relationship to food production, systemic poverty, and urban development. And in the private dining room, Love Is All You Need pays homage to 21c founders Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson: the paintings and objects on view here are drawn from their personal collections, while the wallpaper features patterns of the flowers grown in the gardens of their home in Oldham County.

“The practices of everyday life,” explain the artists, are “everyday interactions by everyday people that create community and generate the stories that become history and mythology. It is the both the extraordinary and the overlooked that together simultaneously make a place special and unique.  There are moments in life that we share communally, often regionally, and sometimes generationally, that are meant to be celebrated, shared, and remembered. These moments may be discovered in the mundane, or hidden away in archives for future generations.  We are interested in the idea of the public, citizenship, and community, and how everyday people are poets and scribes and artists and documentarians as much as they are strangers, neighbors, and friends. As artists, we realize that it is not one particular story that tells the truth about a place. Instead we believe that community is formed by many different people’s stories and collectively these stories about place and people form the cultural bonds we celebrate and honor through local traditions and more.” 

Founded in 1778, and named after King Louis XVI of France, Louisville has negotiated boundaries and bridged shifts between “here and there” from the beginning. . Defined by the Ohio River on the north and the west, it was once frontierland at the edge of the United States; until 1816 it functioned as a  gateway to the West.  The area served  as a  boundary between the North and the South during the Civil War.  Enslaved African Americans escaped to freedom here, where the Underground Railroad crossed the river. The word “Kentucky” translates from native languages as “the blood of the land”) but it also can mean the “place of tomorrow.” It was the beginning and end of the explorations of Lewis and Clark. In the 20th century the federal government twice obstructed river access, first by installing massive flood control walls following the great flood of 1937, and later in the 1960’s by building interstate highways that block the city’s relationship to its waterfront.

While  the artists found diversity and difference in  the city, they say, “We learned that one thing Louisvillians have in common is that they are neither Southern nor Northern, not from the West coast or the East coast; they are kind, welcoming people from an important region of Kentucky that has a long history in the United States, and a pride in heritage and love of family that is both steadfast and true.”  Young and Burns note that  Louisville  is home to several expansive historical archives that contain vast collections of photography, film, personal effects, legal documents, and ephemera. They add, “These types of archives exist in most major cities in the United States, however the depth and breadth of the archives at the Carnegie Center for Art and History, the Indiana Room at the New Albany Public Library, the University of Louisville, and the Filson Historical Society are models for the entire country .”

“The archival materials for the installation project activate selected images that explore meanings of everyday life through the lenses of other people’s cameras,” observe the artists. “We use language and phrases excerpted from the page’s other peoples’ notebooks and diaries—although the display of the artwork renders authorship of the material anonymous. After all, our collaboration is with people who we cannot ever really know.”

Some of the images the artists installed may seem cliché or banal, while  others offer challenges. . The content selected spans several generations, from the mid-1800s to the present day. By  their  nature archives often contain things that were once private; personal meanings from other peoples’ lives get replaced over time, becoming signifiers that represent a broader understanding.  Often the subjects of the stories that have been isolated and removed from context in hard to find file boxes  become  transformed in a new context that speaks to and reflects contemporary experiences.

“We believe that contemporary art has the ability to shift vision, alter meaning and explore humanity,” say Burns and Young, “In these ways both abstraction and collage may appear beautiful to a stranger or passerby, and at the same time could also inspire an in-depth discovery of the sundry and nuanced complexities embedded in these images, objects, and documents from other people’s lives. The element of chance is an important part of any discovery. It is the unexpected message you may come across in daily life that redirects your attention, or that important ,‘glimpse in a mirror’  that creates a short pause, or an unexpected rainbow you see on a landscape that makes you smile regardless of age. This opportunity to allow the unexpected into our lives may change a perception of space and an experience of time even for a short moment. Like a breath or a pause in movement, a flicker in an old film, a pop on an old recording, these glitches are a form of magic that reminds us that life is really happening in the moment and we are all in the process of living it with everyone around us. In these ways both the extraordinary and banal become temporarily equal and these forms of collective experience become integrated with our own individual authorship of life—in a very basic way we have no other choice.” 

“We are interested in the idea of the public, citizenship, and community, and how everyday people are poets and scribes and artists and documentarians as much as they are strangers, neighbors, and friends,” say the artists.

Exhibited Works

Installations:

It Happens To Everyone Some Day / The Last “Gay” Bar In America, found frames, found photography from the archives of Emily Bingham, David Williams, John Lair, Bill Carner, Letitia Quesenbarry and the archives at the University of Louisville, original pin-up photography, found objects, custom soundtrack and  video playlist on Youtube, 2016

Kentucky /  , found frames, found taxidermy busts, original photography from Goshen, Kentucky, found photography from the Edward Curtis collection at The Library of Congress, 2016

Farm To Table / 1864 – 2016, found frames, found objects, found photography, 2016

All You Need Is Love, found objects from personal collections and archives of Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson, 2016

Sculpture:

Bizarre Love Triangle, found objects, epoxy acrylic paint, 2016

The Golden Pussy, found object, gold leaf gilding, 2016

It Feels Like The First Time, found object, epoxy, acrylic paint, 2016

#PARTY, found object, epoxy, acrylic paint, 2016

The Innocents, found object, found locket necklaces, portraits of the senior class from a 1964 yearbook, epoxy, acrylic paint, 2016

Acknowledgments:

Fallen Fruit and 21c Museum Hotel are deeply grateful to the Carnegie Center for Art and History, New Albany, the Indiana Room at the New Albany Public Library, the University of Louisville, and the Filson Historical Society for granting the artists access to their archives. We also wish to acknowledge the generosity of the Indiana Room and the Carnegie Center for providing many of the images and documents featured in The Practices of Everyday Life. Additional materials were made available by the Library of Congress, and by individual members of this community, including Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson, Emily Bingham, David Williams, and others.

ABOUT 21c MUSEUM HOTEL

A multi-venue museum, 21c was founded by Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson, contemporary art collectors and preservationists who are committed to bringing works of art to the public through innovative exhibitions and programs that integrate contemporary art into daily life. 21c Museum presents a range of arts programming curated by Museum Director, Chief Curator Alice Gray Stites, including thought-provoking solo and group exhibitions that reflect the global nature of art today, as well as site-specific, commissioned installations, and a variety of cultural events. The organization collaborates on arts initiatives with artists and organizations worldwide, including North Carolina Museum of Art, MASS MoCA, Contemporary Art Museum Houston, The Barnes Foundation, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, Creative Capital Foundation, and others. Since opening in Louisville, KY in 2006, 21c Museum has presented more than 85 exhibitions, including Cuba Now!;
Alter Ego: A Decade of Work by Anthony Goicolea; Blue: Matter, Mood, and Melancholy; Aftermath: Witnessing War, Countenancing Compassion; Hybridity: The New Frontier; Seeing Now; Dis-semblance: Projecting and Perceiving Identity; Albano Afonso: Self-Portrait as Light; and Pop Stars! Popular Culture and Contemporary Art

 

 

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Lemonade and Dragon Fruit! August 13th

Upcoming Summer Participatory Events In Los Angeles! The HUB is the central site of LA Water Public Art Biennial, 2016   see the official event calendar.

The HUB
3306 Riverside Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90027

Water-wise Public Planters: A RAINBOW OF FRUIT TREES : July 16 – August 17

Propagation Station : August 13th  10am- 12pm 

Lemonade Stand :  August 13th 11am- 1pm

Lemonade Stand is a public participatory project where in exchange for a glass of lemonade the public is asked to draw their portrait onto a lemon using a black marker.

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Propagation Station : August 13th  11am- 1pm 

a public participatory project that anyone can perform by propagating a drought tolerant fruit bearing plant that can be added to The Endless Orchard and shared with everyone. Bring cuttings of your back yard fruit to share and plant them around LA!   …Dragon Fruit, Tunas, Fig, Pomegranate, Pineapple!  This years favorite fruit is Dragonfruit- a succulent fruit and superfood native to Mexico – but also a plant that grows easily in Southern California.  Anyone can propagate, share, and adopt a cutting they will take home and root and then transplant and map on the Endless Orchard.  cuttings are decorated with paint and inks to illustrate a “spirit animal” or “messages” to invoke goodwill and citizenship in the City of Los Angeles.  There is no money exchanged- just knowledge sharing and fruit tree sharing.

 BYOF: Do you have a fruit tree in your yard or in your neighborhood that you **LOVE**??
We  want to help you share the love.
Bring a young branch from the fruit tree or plant that is 2’-3’ feet long with all of the smaller branches and leave still attached.
NOTE: Make sure that you do not cut from a tree that currently have fruit ripening (this will not work)

dragon fruit

fallen fruit

Water-wise Public Planters: A RAINBOW OF FRUIT TREES : August 13th 10am – 12pm
by Fallen Fruit is an ongoing installation on view at the HUB.

The Endless Orchard is an on-going installation of fruit trees in (the margins of) public space and is designed to provide communities with an urban experience that can be cared for, cultivated and shared by the public. ‘Urban Fruit Trails’ have been planted in Los Angeles, New York City, Omaha,  Portland and more. The goal is to connect neighborhoods with fruit bearing trees and create walking trails from public transportation to local landmarks. The public fruit trees are planted on the margins of public space, along sidewalks, alleys and parkways where the fruit can be shared with everyone.IMG_0300 copy

Presented by Dyson and Womack at the HUB – with  the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs Public Art Division, CURRENT:LA Water Public Art Biennial uses contemporary art as a platform for the exchange of ideas around critical issues our city faces together.

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a Rainbow of Fruit Trees!

Water Wise Public Planters: A Rainbow of Fruit Trees! at the HUB  by Fallen Fruit  3306 Riverside Dr, Los Angeles  installed with the public on Saturday July 16, 2016.  The HUB is the central site of Current:LA WATER: Water Public Art Biennial uses contemporary art as a platform for the exchange of ideas around critical issues our city faces together.
fallen fruit los angeles public art
Fallen Fruit’s Barrel Painting and Planting at the HUB with our Water-wise Public Planters.

HUB> CURRENT:LA CALENDAR
water current la fallen fruit

fallen fruit public artThe HUB is  hosted  by DYSON AND WOMACK
Fallen Fruit’s installation of painted  Barrels at the HUB  forms a RAINBOW of FRUIT TREES and will be part of The Endless Orchard – an on-going installation in (the margins of) public space, designed to provide communities with an urban experience that can be cared for, cultivated and shared by the public. These ‘Urban Fruit Trails’ have been planted in Los Angeles, New York City, Omaha, Portland and more. The goal is to connect neighborhoods with fruit bearing trees and create walking trails from public transportation to local landmarks. The public fruit trees are along sidewalks, alleys and parkways where the fruit can be shared with everyone.

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The Endless Orchard at William Mead Housing Planting Day!

WILLIAM MEAD RESIDENTS: Plant fruit trees for everyone to share!

Join Fallen Fruit’s ‘The Endless Orchard’ Planting

and Barrel Painting Day for William Mead Homes!

June 5th – 10 am to 2 pm in front of William Mead’s Social Hall

*This Tree adoption is for William Mead Homes residents only

william_mead_housing_dog_town

Adopt a community fruit tree and barrel for William Mead Housing:

What if instead of going to the grocery store for an orange or lemon, you just walked outside your door? Imagine a future in which cities and neighborhoods across the world are not only full of fruit trees, but mapped and labeled so that you can walk up to them and pick the fruit yourself. It takes a community to grow an Endless Orchard – and you can help bring this sustainable, collaborative public artwork to fruition!

Being a part The Endless Orchard is easy:

  1. Sign up to adopt one of 24 fruit trees to share with the William Mead Homes community
  2. Join us on Saturday, June 5th to plant the trees and paint the 55 gallon planter!
  3. Agree to help care for the fruit trees and share the fruit with neighbors.
  4. Together, we’ll make a map and place the fruit trees within William Mead community.

To Participate: email  info@fallenfruit.org. Include your name and phone number.

LIMITED NUMBER OF TREES SO SIGN UP TODAY !

The Endless Orchard is an on-going installation of fruit trees on or in the margins of public space and designed to provide communities with an urban experience that can be cared for, cultivated and shared by the public. ‘Urban Fruit Trails’ have already been planted in Los Angeles, Riverside, Omaha and Portland. The goal is to connect neighborhoods and create walking trails from public transportation to local destinations. The fruit trees are planted on the margins of public space, along sidewalks and parkways where the fruit can be shared with everyone. The trailhead will be at the orange grove in Los Angeles State Historic Park and fruit trees will lead out into the surrounding neighborhoods.

 

www.fallenfruit.org 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Endless Orchard: phase one- planting day!

PHASE 1:   We’ve planted tons of fruit trees in the neighborhood surrounding Los Angeles State Historic Park in Downtown LA!  In the weeks leading up to this Phase of The Endless Orchard, we went door to door in the community to meet with residents, businesses, schools and churches and we found stewards for the new public fruit trees. These same neighbors came to help us plant the trees in front of their properties along sidewalks and agreed to take care of the trees and share fruit with the everyone.  

Join us for The Endless Orchard PHASE 2!  We’ll be planting more trees, creating our Monument to Sharing, and launching our mobile app where anyone can plant, map and share their fruit!  

Love,

David and Austin

DONATE: Give a 100% tax deductible Donation to help cover our expenses for The Endless Orchard Phase 2.

Volunteer for our next planting day! Come helps us plant or if you live near The Los Angeles State Historic Park, adopt a free tree, map and care for it.

 

Becoming part of The Endless Orchard is easy:

1. You have space along sidewalks and fences on private property
– a home, local business or apartment building.

2. The space is sunny and is already being watered or can be watered regularly.

3. You agree to share the fruit tree with neighbors and passersby and be part of
The Endless Orchard where Trees are mapped and shared with the community.

4. Join us March 19th at 10 am at Los Angeles State Historic Park.
We will give you a fruit tree. (Apricots, Apples, Figs, Grapes, Pomegranates and Plums.) We will have volunteers to help plant if needed. It takes a community to grow an Endless Orchard – and you can help bring this sustainable, collaborative public art work to fruition.

email > INFO@FALLENFRUIT.ORG and get involved! It’s free to participate – sign up for a fruit tree at no cost and/or volunteer and help us plant trees on the margins of public space.

The Endless Orchard is an on-going installation of fruit trees on or in the margins of public space and designed to provide communities with an urban experience that can be cared for, cultivated and shared by the public. ‘Urban Fruit Trails’ have already been planted in Los Angeles, Riverside, Omaha and Portland. The goal is to connect neighborhoods and create walking trails from public transportation to local destinations. The fruit trees are planted on the margins of public space, along sidewalks and parkways where the fruit can be shared with everyone. The trailhead will be at the orange grove in Los Angeles State Historic Park and fruit trees will lead out into the surrounding neighborhoods.  The Endless Orchard App will launch in June 2016 – anyone, anywhere can participate and share fruit!

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The Endless Orchard planting day in Louisville, Kentucky

Hey Louisville! Be a part of Fallen Fruit’s ‘The Endless Orchard’
and help create an URBAN FRUIT TRAIL around historic Portland in Louisville.
WED 3.23.16 9AM
Shippingport Garden, 2500 Montgomery Street

portland endless orchard fallen fruit

Fallen Fruit teams up with two local nonprofits, Trees Louisville and Louisville Grows, to plant fruit trees on The Endless Orchard in the historic Portland neighborhood at the Portland Orchard Project.


We will plant and map fruit trees for our massive edible artwork, The Endless Orchard in Louisville with Trees Louisville and Louisville Grows as a companion project to our upcoming 21c Museum Hotel art installation in Proof on Main.

We will be planting fruit trees  in the Portland neighborhood on March 23, starting at 9am. The public is invited to come and learn more about The Endless Orchard, Trees Louisville, and Louisville Grows.
RSVP to info@fallenfruit.org if you are interested in volunteering.

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The Endless Orchard Kick Off Planting Day!

Be a part of Fallen Fruit’s ‘The Endless Orchard’
and help create an URBAN FRUIT TRAIL
around The Los Angeles State Historic Park
Planting day! March 19th at 10 am to 2pm at 1799 Baker Street
Meet us under the North Broadway Bridge at the Viaduct.
the endless orchard fallen fruit los angeles

Volunteer! Come helps us plant or if you live near The Los Angeles State Historic Park, adopt a free tree, map and care for it. Becoming part of The Endless Orchard is easy:

1. You have space along sidewalks and fences on private property
– a home, local business or apartment building.

2. The space is sunny and is already being watered or can be watered regularly.

3. You agree to share the fruit tree with neighbors and passersby and be part of
The Endless Orchard where Trees are mapped and shared with the community.

4. Join us March 19th at 10 am at Los Angeles State Historic Park.
We will give you a fruit tree. (Apricots, Apples, Figs, Grapes, Pomegranates and Plums.) We will have volunteers to help plant if needed. It takes a community to grow an Endless Orchard – and you can help bring this sustainable, collaborative public art work to fruition.

email > INFO@FALLENFRUIT.ORG and get involved! It’s free to participate – sign up for a fruit tree at no cost and/or volunteer and help us plant trees on the margins of public space.
20160308_095923
200 beautiful fruit trees await adoption.

The Endless Orchard is an on-going installation of fruit trees on or in the margins of public space and designed to provide communities with an urban experience that can be cared for, cultivated and shared by the public. ‘Urban Fruit Trails’ have already been planted in Los Angeles, Riverside, Omaha and Portland. The goal is to connect neighborhoods and create walking trails from public transportation to local destinations. The fruit trees are planted on the margins of public space, along sidewalks and parkways where the fruit can be shared with everyone. The trailhead will be at the orange grove in Los Angeles State Historic Park and fruit trees will lead out into the surrounding neighborhoods.

The Endless Orchard by Fallen Fruit, David Burns and Austin Young. It’s a Creative Capital awarded project. It’s organized in collaboration with Los Angeles State Historic Park.
The Endless Orchard app is collaboration with digital agency Code Rodeo. Partners include: Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Bronx River Art Center, Caldera, CSULA (California State University Los Angeles), Chung King Road Association (Chinatown), Concordia University, Creative Capital, Friends of Trees, Good Works Foundation, HOLA (Heart of Los Angeles), Kent Bellows Mentoring Program, l.a. Eyeworks, LACC (Los Angeles City College), LACC (Los Angeles Conservation Corps), Los Angeles State Historic Park, MRCA (Mountain Recreation Conservancy Agency), Park To Playa, The Awesome Foundation, The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, The Los Angeles County Arts Commission, The Muriel Pollia Foundation, The Rauschenberg Foundation, OPC (Oficina de Proyectos Culturales), Open School North, Peninsula School, Portland Art Museum, Portland Fruit Tree Project, Root Pouch, Wexner Center for the Arts and more.

About Fallen Fruit
Fallen Fruit began by mapping fruit trees growing on or over public property in Los Angeles. The collaboration has expanded to include public projects, site-specific installations and happenings in various cities around the world. Fallen Fruit is an art collaboration originally conceived in 2004 by David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. Since 2013, David and Austin have continued the collaborative work. www.fallenfruit.org

*The Endless Orchard map is for illustration purposes and is only an example of how to imagine a neighborhood experience. Please ask tree owners whenever possible. Never pick someone tree on private property without permission.

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The Endless Orchard

Fallen Fruit_ Fruit Hands
Support our KICKSTARTER.

We are expanding the Urban Fruit Trails in neighborhoods & expanding the Endless Orchard app in 2016. Please support public fruit!
PLANT, MAP, AND SHARE FRUIT!

The Endless Orchard is a collaborative movement of citizens transforming their own neighborhoods.

The project relies on those who know a city best – the people who live there – to envision what their own neighborhood would be like with the addition of trees bearing fruit, knitted together with other neighborhoods by pathways of apples, peaches, apricots and pears.

Fruit trees planted to grow along sidewalks and overlooked urban spaces become an invitation for the public to explore and enjoy cities in a new way.

Signage placed at each tree explains that this is part of a network of Urban Fruit Trails and that fruit is a symbol of sharing with others.

The California State Historic Park becomes a central landmark and a site for the ‘Monument to Sharing’ leading to Urban Fruit Trails that reach into neighborhoods around Downtown Los Angeles and out into the world.

COMMUNITY CALL TO ACTION — Fallen Fruit is fund-raising for expanding public fruit in public space. It is easy to change your neighborhood and transform public space. Everyone can participate!

*We do not share emails. We respect your privacy.

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Fallen Fruit Artist Talk

Join us for an artist talk!
When:
November 15, 2015 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
get tickets here: Portland Art Museum

 

 

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FALLEN FRUIT at BRAC

HARVEST/HAERFEST
Please join the Bronx River Art Center at the temporary gallery at WHEDco’s Bronx Music Heritage Center

Harvest/Haerfest focuses on reaping (harvesting) the “fruits” (including vegetables and fish) of our labor over a growing season, and offers an opportunity to join forces with creative artists to encourage and celebrate the commitment of Bronxites to the value of healthy food and the diverse cultures in the Bronx that influences our awarenesses.

On view October 23rd – November 20th, 2015
at the Bronx Music Heritage Center at 1303 Louis Nine Blvd, Bronx, NY.

As part of the exhibition, Fallen Fruit will plant fruit trees to create the first Urban Fruit Trails in the Bronx !

Featured Artists:
Fallen Fruit, Linda Adele Goodine, Hyonok Kim, Yelaine Rodriguez and Bill Santen
fallen fruit bronx river art center
More about the exhibitions series:
This exhibition series is designed to shine light on the fact that although The Bronx is at the heart of New York City’s food system (the Bronx Terminal Produce Market supplies fruits and vegetables to supermarkets and restaurants across the city, feeding millions of its inhabitants), ironically, many parts of the borough are identified as “food deserts.” This paradox engenders questions that this exhibition series seeks to answer: How are Bronx residents affected by the available food choices? What are the challenges for a 21st-century city to feed all of its population? How are ideas of sustainability, livability and healthy environments being explored in our borough; and how should they be implemented for the future health and well-being of our community? What roles can artists, community organizations and local activists play within these scenarios? The conceptual framework of Food: Systems, Surroundings & Sensibilities addresses these questions in order to identify inspiring and achievable solutions through the cross-fertilization of artists with our community’s diverse groups of inhabitants, and within its specific and distinctive landscape.

About the Bronx River Art Center:
Bronx River Art Center (BRAC) is a culturally diverse, multi-arts, non-profit organization that provides a forum for community, artists, and youth to transform creativity into vision. Our Education, Exhibitions, and Presenting Programs cultivate leadership in an urban environment and stewardship of our natural resource, the Bronx River. For more information visit www.bronxriverart.org

This project is supported in part with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works; The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and The New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and The New York State Legislature. Related education and public programs are supported, in part, by Con Edison, the 42nd Street Development Corporation, the New Yankee Stadium Community Development Program and the generosity of our patrons.

The Bronx River Art Center expresses its appreciation for the support of The City of New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., Council members Ritchie Torres, Andy King and members of the Council’s Bronx Delegation.

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Urban Fruit Trails PDX

Join us! It’s free to participate!
ADOPT A TREE> MAP, PLANT AND SHARE FRUIT TREES!
Fallen Fruit’s URBAN FRUIT TRAILS PDX!
fallen fruit caldera
Welcome to the Urban Fruit Trail
Urban Fruit Trails are a network of walking trails, populated with fruit trees and planted, tended, and harvested by the public. With your collaboration, we will make the largest public artwork in the world.

The Urban Fruit Trail is presented by Caldera and created by Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young). Fruit trees are planted next to the sidewalk in front of private homes, schools, businesses and community gardens, so that branches will grow into public space and be within easy reach. Caldera youth, their families, Caldera’s Arts Partner middle schools, along with the greater community of Portland are encouraged to celebrate family stories and histories, local facts and historic lore along the trails through an interactive online Urban Fruit Trails map. Trees will be mapped on the URBAN FRUIT TRAILS map where you can share fruit, read stories, view art,and look at videos inspired by the fruit trees, community, and family.

Partners include: Portland Fruit Tree Project, Friends of Trees, Portland Art Museum, Root Pouch, Concordia University, Open School North, and Peninsula School.

Fallen Fruit urban fruit trails

Portland’s Urban Fruit Trail will become part of Fallen Fruit’s Endless Orchard, which is a collection of interactive online maps from around the world of fruit trails. Individual fruit trees are geo-tagged for anyone to digitally view art, read stories, and look at videos inspired by the apple trees.

To include your fruit tree in URBAN FRUIT TRAILS:

Plant your tree next to the sidewalk so that branches will go into public space and be within easy reach. Plant it today if possible.

Map the tree. And/or map a tree that you already have that is accessible to the public. Check “YES I want to be part of the online map” when you fill out your name, and the tree’s new address along with the tree type and variety on the Urban Fruit Trail sign up at the adoption table.

Once the tree is planted
, send us a photo of the planting or newly planted, the date of the plant and if you like, a very short story about the tree planting or celebrate family stories and histories, local facts and historic lore along the trails. Stories and photos will go on the interactive online Urban Fruit Trails map. If you did not give your information on the day of pick-up and you want to be included on the Endless Orchard online map or if there is an update to the tree’s location, please send the new information to: info@fallenfruit.org

View your tree and share your fruit on the Urban Fruit Trail! in a few years when fruit trees get bigger and produce 100’s of pounds of fruit, there’ll be plenty to share! www.fallenfruit.org/endless-orchard/portland/

About Fallen Fruit

Fallen Fruit is an art collaboration originally conceived in 2004 by David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. Since 2013, David and Austin have continued the collaborative work. Fallen Fruit began by mapping fruit trees growing on or over public property in Los Angeles. The collaboration has expanded to include public projects, site-specific installations and happenings in various cities around the world. Share your fruit, change the world!

www.fallenfruit.org/

About Caldera

Caldera is a nonprofit organization that supports youth with limited opportunities through long-term mentoring and arts and nature programming, as well as provides fully subsidized residencies to adult artists. Caldera provides year-round youth mentoring through 12 Arts Partner middle schools (six in Portland and six Central Oregon), high school programming, and summer camp at its Arts Center on Blue Lake near Sisters, Oregon. More information at www.CalderaArts.org.

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PARADISE at Portland Art Museum

Paradise

Fallen Fruit  (David Burns and Austin Young)

Join us! Opening day, A Day in Paradise, will feature site specific art works by Oregon based artists and it’s free for everyone! Look here.
Portland Art Museum
OCT 24, 2015 – JAN 17, 2016

“…I was upon the summit of a tall mountain which commands a bewildering prospect of that loved valley… The birds of autumn caroled their soft melodies around, and the blushing flowret bent at the feet of the intruder… Away to the north was the smoke wreathing above the trees which clustered around the lone mission-house and I thought there was an altar to God, and incense from the bosom of the wilderness.”
—Excerpt from A Sketch of the Oregon Territory, or Emigrant’s Guide, Philip L. Edwards, 1842.

Fallen Fruit portland art museum
Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), Apple Wallpaper (Paradise edition), dimensions variable, 2015 This custom designed wallpaper echoes the 19th century and the era of the founding of art museums in the United States.

By the 1850s, the rutted Oregon Trail ferried large numbers of settlers into the heart of the Willamette Valley. A steady diet of florid guidebooks promised a fecund new Eden where everything grew. Oregon came packaged as a vision of “paradise,” ripe with possibility and a symbol of Westward Expansion and Manifest Destiny.

The artist collaborative Fallen Fruit will explore Oregon’s paradisiacal backyard through the lens of Portland Art Museum’s permanent collection. Based in Los Angeles, artists David Allen Burns and Austin Young create site-specific projects using fruit to examine concepts of place, history, and issues of representation often addressing questions of public space.

The apple is a fruit that has come to represent the hearty bounty of the Northwest with deep connections to the landscape and of westward movement. It’s often a symbol of moral questioning and serves as a metaphoric reference to the Garden of Eden. In Paradise, Fallen Fruit will create an eye-popping immersive art installation in the Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court using the Portland Art Museum’s permanent collections to thematically explore concepts of “paradise,” sublime landscape, and the greater Northwest.
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David and Austin studying the “anchor” painting, Mount Hood by Albert Bierstadt, 1869 for Paradise.
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Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson, the Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Curator of Northwest Art and Stephanie Parrish, Associate Director of Education and Public Programs in front of Floral Arrangement After Bierstadt, Sherrie Wolf, 2003, 2004

Fallen Fruit of Portland
Paradise is part of Fallen Fruit of Portland, a suite of five site-specific projects taking place throughout Portland in October and November 2015. Other Fallen Fruit of Portland projects include Urban Fruit Trails, The Geography of We (a youth curated exhibition at Weiden+Kennedy Gallery), Division of Identification, and the commissioning of eight Oregon-based artist projects. All projects are presented by Caldera and funded by a Creative Heights grant from The Oregon Community Foundation. For more information on the Fallen Fruit of Portland projects or Caldera, please visit here.

About the Portland Art Museum
The seventh oldest museum in the United States, the Portland Art Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions drawn from the Museum’s holdings and the world’s finest public and private collections. The Museum’s collection of more than 45,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution dedicated to preserving great art for the enrichment of future generations, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to its permanent collection. The Museum’s campus of landmark buildings, a cornerstone of Portland’s cultural district, includes the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, the Schnitzer Center for Northwest Art, the Northwest Film Center, and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art. With a membership of more than 18,000 households and serving more than 350,000 visitors annually, the Museum is a premier venue for education in the visual arts. For information on exhibitions and programs, call 503-226-2811 or visit portlandartmuseum.org.

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A Day in Paradise – October 24th

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Caldera Presents
Fallen Fruit of Portland!
Join us for a day of free events and site specific artworks created by artist collaborative Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young), Natalie Ball, Bill Cravis, Bruce Conkle, Tahni Holt, Aaron Lish, Jess Perlitz, DeAngelo Raines, Caldera Youth and the Portland Art Museum.

A Day in Paradise

Saturday, October 24, 2015,  10am-8pm
Everyone is invited to participate! Paradise will move from the museum onto the park blocks and into downtown Portland.  A Day in Paradise will celebrate the opening of ‘Paradise’ at the Portland Art Museum by  Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young) and an exhibition project created by Caldera Youth called the ‘Geography of We’ opens concurrently at the Weiden+Kennedy Gallery. The public is invited to observe, interact and help create collaborative art making that is inspired by the history of Portland, themes of paradise and of course, the apple.
War Hoop with us! We’ll make a Magazine together! Share poems and songs with the river! Become a monument! Enter the right hand of the fellowship! Watch a rock  move rocks!
EVERYTHING is FREE!

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Natalie Ball, Warhoop Flashmob
2pm, Location: Portland Art Museum
Natalie will facilitate War Hooping as used in battle by Native Americans across the country. Also known as a battle cry, Li-Li is a vocal projection used for intimidation, celebration, and energy charge. Women use Lii-Lii which is a tongue/vocal projection that is LOUD! They still do them today. Natalie will bring people from her tribe to do Lii-Lii, but everyone in the attendance will be invited to participate with them.
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Johnny Rotten Appleseed 2015
Bruce Conkle Paradise Lost
6 – 8pm, Location: RACC Building, 411 NW Park Ave
Bruce Conkle, “Paradise Lost”
Bruce Conkle has created apple inspired drawings from history, mythology, and pop culture. He will electronically and astrally project these images outdoors on a large wall along the Park Blocks.

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Bill Cravis, ​A Monument for Bicyclists
Noon – 4pm, Location: South Parks Block by the equestrian statue of  Theodore Roosevelt across from Portland Art Museum
Portland bicyclists become temporary “living statues” in the South Parks neighborhood, alongside the equestrian statue of Theodore Roosevelt. A small replica of the concrete plinth supporting the Roosevelt statue will be placed near to the original. Bicyclists will be invited to become temporary “living statues” atop the miniature plinth, which will be photographed. These urban bicyclists will be displayed as today’s heroes – contemporary mavericks who play an active role in reducing the threat of global climate change. Photos will be placed online so that participants can download them.

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Tahni Holt, ​ apples & pomegranates
1 & 3pm, Location: Portland Art Museum
Building on the mythological idea of Eve eating the apple in the Garden of Eden, this is a solo dance performance that walks the fault line between rejected female stereotypes and embodied expression, wrestling with first impressions, assumptions and associations, motherhood, sensationalism, emotionality, sexuality, an image/time­bound body, and the body in the present moment.  Sound Score and technical support by Luke Wyland

 

 

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Aaron Lish​,  Sweet Nothings and Other Stories.
Noon – 5pm, Location: along the Willamette Riverfront trail at Ankeny (near the Bill Naito Legacy Fountain)
To celebrate the Willamette River, the public is invited to share stories, poetry, songs, etc. with the River as receiver / audience. There will be an installation at the Riverwalk overlook just south of the Saturday Market that will conduct your voices down to the water.  The site is right near the Bill Naito Legacy Fountain, which memorializes the names of those who helped make Portland what it is today. But the Willamette River is not on that list of names. “Sweet Nothings and Other Stories” has been created to celebrate the River in a new and different way, where your sharing is a form of gift to the River.

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rock map jess perlitz small Jess Perlitz Rock moving rocks 11am-4pm, Location: The route for the rock will begin near the Hawthorne Bridge moving along the Eastbank Esplanade, over the Tilikum Crossing, ending at the Art Museum.
For a day, along the west shore of the Willamette River in Portland, the artist will be a rock and will move other rocks, engaging with the surrounding world. Inspired by landscape and landscaping, landmarks and monuments, natural disaster and our never ending attempts for control, this piece will be an action that unfolds over the course of 5 hours. The r​ock w​ill have arms and legs available so that it may move other similar objects, rest, and engage with people as needed. The rock does not talk. But it does try to communicate through music, action, and presence.

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DeAngelo Raines, The Right Hand of Fellowship
Noon – 4pm, Location: South Parks Blocks at the Lincoln Statue
With the belief that barriers to identification can be overcome, DeAngelo Raines proposes a performative social engagement installation to exhibit multiple handshakes from 7 different archetypes of the adult African-American Male.

 

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Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young)
The Division of Identification
All Day, Location: Throughout Park Blocks
October 24, 2015 -­ January 17, 2016 
during Paradise ​exhibition at Portland Art Museum. DIVISION OF IDENTIFICATION

These selected portraits are sourced from a volume of police arrest mug shots found in the City of Portland Archives collections.  Created by the Division of Identification, now the Police Identification Division, the photos date between 1947 and 1954. The body of works is presented as a photographic installation in public space that unmasks issues of humanity often camouflaged by social stereotypes and ill-repute of “the other.”  The large scale black and white photographic portraits have been installed throughout the Park Blocks of Downtown Portland the same historic locations where people have been arrested for “vagrancy” or other social crimes. “The Division of Identification” is part of Fallen Fruit of Portland presented by Caldera through a Creative Heights grant from the Oregon Community Foundation. Caldera students will interview the public and each other about reactions to the portraits for broadcast on KBOO.
FallenFruit Magazine
Fallen Fruit, Fruit Magazine Issue #2, PDX
Noon – 4pm, Location: Portland Art Museum
In one day the public, along with David Burns and Austin Young, will use fruit and its metaphors to create a limited edition contemporary culture magazine. Fruit Magazine‘s Portland­ specific content will feature native languages and visual vocabularies that reflect Portland’s diversity. “Fruit Magazine” will be published as a downloadable PDF accessible at w​ww.CalderaArts.org/FallenFruitPDX​ and w​ww.fallenfruit.org/fallenfruitmagazine​

CELEBRATE The EXHIBITION OPENINGS:
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Fallen Fruit, Paradise
October 24, 2015 ­ January 17, 2016
Location: Portland Art Museum
This exhibition, on display in the Portland Art Museum’s Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court October 24 through January 17, More information can be found here.
caldera youth fallen fruit a day in paradise
Caldera Youth, The Culture of We
Location: Wieden+Kennedy Gallery 224 NW 13th Ave
October 24th – ­ November 13
The Culture of We showcases the power of creativity through the voices of Caldera students. Inspired by Caldera’s environmental themes, student work displayed reflects unique youth perspectives, reactions, and inspirations surrounding “The Geography of We”. Artwork is installed salon­ style, and will create a dialogue of how the individual contributes to community. This exhibition highlights Caldera’s focus on the integration of art and nature and powerful work with special guest artists like Fallen Fruit.

UPCOMING: RSVP NOW!
urban fruit trails portland fallen fruit
Urban Fruit Trails, PDX
Saturday, November 14, 2015
Locations: TBD and located throughout Portland
Hey Portland! Anyone can participate! If you have space to plant near a sidewalk, can care for the tree, and include it on the Urban Fruit Trail map, please email us! info @ fallenfruit.org. Caldera and Fallen Fruit are producing an installation and public planting of approximately 200 fruit trees in community gardens, private homes, churches and businesses that allow public access to fruit. Caldera youth, their families, Caldera’s Arts Partner middle schools, along with the greater community of Portland will celebrate family stories and histories, local facts and historic lore along the trails through signs at tree sites and with an interactive online Urban Fruit Trails map. Trees will be geo­tagged for anyone to digitally view art, read stories, and look at videos inspired by the apple trees. P​artners: P​ortland Fruit Tree Project, Friends of Trees, Know Your City, Oregon Food Bank, Portland Art Museum, Root Pouch, Concordia University, Open School North and others to be announced.

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Oregon Community Foundation Creative Heights Initiative Award
Print

About Caldera
Established in 1996 by Dan Wieden, co-founder of the Portland, Oregon-based international ad agency Wieden+Kennedy, Caldera is a nonprofit organization that supports youth with limited opportunities through long-term mentoring and arts and nature programming, as well as provides fully subsidized residencies to adult artists. It provides year-round youth mentoring through 12 Arts Partner middle schools (six in Portland and six Central Oregon), high school programming, and summer camp at its Arts Center on Blue Lake near Sisters, Oregon. More information at www.CalderaArts.org.

Elizabeth Quinn is the Creative Director for Caldera. Previous to her work at Caldera, she was the Founding Editor of High Desert Journal, a publication that strives for a deeper understanding of the interior West through arts and literature. She also helped found Playa, a residency program in Summer Lake, Oregon, and was the Director of The Dalles Art Association. Having worked across Oregon, Elizabeth has developed in-depth knowledge of arts communities throughout the state and an understanding of the unique needs of artists from diverse backgrounds.

About Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights Initiative
Through a four­ year initiative (2014­2017), the Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights Initiative provides grants to help arts and culture organizations take strategic risks in the creation and dissemination of their work in Oregon, provide unique opportunities for Oregonians to experience innovative arts and culture, and to increase Oregon’s cultural visibility and vitality.  more information here.

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Hey New York! Plant a fruit tree! Sep. 26

Plant a Tree with Fallen Fruit
It’s part of The Value of Food
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2015
12 PM – 2 PM, PULPIT GREEN
St. John the Divine

Los Angeles collective Fallen Fruit, comprised of David Burns and Austin Young, want you—yes, you—to help them plant some small apple trees along the one of the sides of the Cathedral’s Pulpit Green as part of “Temptation,” their multimedia piece for The Value of Food.
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This is an invitation from Burns and Young to “share and explore the meaning of community and collaboration.” They have devoted many years to similar tree mapping and planting projects in dozens of other cities, including Copenhagen, Denmark; Boulder, Colorado; Greensboro, North Carolina; and Houston, Texas.
Bring a bottle of water, comfortable clothes, gardening gloves, and a pointed shovel (if you have one) to participate. Everyone will congregate on the Cathedral’s Upper Driveway (between 111th and 112th Streets east of Amsterdam Avenue) at 12 pm.

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The Value of Food opens October 6th in NYC

The Value of Food: Sustaining a Green Planet
The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, New York
1047 Amsterdam Avenue @ 112th Street New York, NY 10025
valueoffood

October 6, 2015 – April 3, 2016 (Opening October 6 from 7:30pm on)

The Venue
Saint John the Divine, The Cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of New York is proud to present The Value of Food: Sustaining a Green Planet, a contemporary art exhibition guest-curated by Kirby Gookin and Robin Kahn. The Cathedral is the world’s largest Gothic structure visited by more than one million people annually. With its long history of engagement with issues of social justice, the environment, support for the arts, and community empowerment, it is a unifying center of intellectual leadership and an exceptional resource center of educational and cultural exhibitions and programs.

The Exhibition
The Value of Food explores the dynamic and organic materiality of food and its integral role in sustaining human life. The artists in this exhibition work with food as a form of social engagement. Although their subjects and methodology vary, they each explore the intersection of food, art, commerce and community in order to engage the exhibition’s unifying theme: food justice.

We will also be presenting a variety of educational programs, workshops and evening events, some in collaboration with Mother Jones, Magnum Foundation and Grace Communications Foundation, as well as with artists and guest speakers.

Pull up a seat and join us at The Tables. Food becomes a meal only when it is shared.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
Suzanne Anker
Stefani Bardin
Anna-Sophie Berger
Pascal Bernier
Mike Bidlo
Matt Black
Mel Chin
Ines Doujak
Eating in Public
Coleen Fitzgibbon
Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young)
Fredericka Foster
Nancy Hwang
Christian Jankowski
Robin Kahn
Alison Knowles
Larry Miller
Vik Muniz
Jan Mun
Peter Nadin
Naoto Nakagawa
Tom Otterness
Claire Pentecost
Alexis Rockman
Christy Rupp
Laura Stein
Tattfoo Tan
Nigel Van Wieck
Kara Walker
Linda Weintraub
Peter Lamborn Wilson

With documentation and ephemera by additional artists involved in these many issues, including: Agnes Denes, Fluxus, Carol Goodden and Gordon Matta-Clark, Fritz Haeg, Corita Kent, Christien Meindertsma, Dieter Roth, Daniel Spoerri, Superflex, Rirkrit Tiravanija, among others.

For more information please contact:
Kirby Gookin: KirbyGookin@yahoo.com Robin Kahn: RobinKahn@yahoo.com

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LEMONADE STAND! when life gives you lemons…

“Lemonade Stand!” A public participatory project by Fallen Fruit (David Burns & Austin Young)
Presented in association with To Live and Dine in L.A. at Los Angeles Public Library.
“Lemonade Stand”, a public participatory artwork by Fallen Fruit exploring ideas of temporary community and new forms of public. During this special presentation on the steps of Central Library, draw a self-portrait onto a lemon and receive a glass of organic lemonade. The lemon self-portraits will collectively form a group portrait of everyone who participated, illustrating some of the archetypes that construct community. “when life gives you lemons…”

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LEMONADE STAND! at the Los Angeles Central Library

Saturday, Aug 29, 2015 | 11:00am – 2:00pm
Maguire Gardens, Central Library
Lemonade Stand!
A public participatory project by Fallen Fruit (David Burns & Austin Young)
Presented in association with To Live and Dine in L.A.

Join us for Lemonade Stand, a public participatory artwork by Fallen Fruit exploring ideas of temporary community and new forms of public. During this special presentation on the steps of Central Library, draw a self-portrait onto a lemon and receive a glass of organic lemonade. The lemon self-portraits will collectively form a group portrait of everyone who participated, illustrating some of the archetypes that construct community. Additionally, as participants are asked to record stories about neighborhood and family, the Lemonade Stand will activate the phrase… “when life gives you lemons…”

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Motherpatch! Spit your seeds!

MOTHERPATCH by Fallen Fruit:
with the Coleman Center for the Arts (CCA) and the people from YORK.
Saturday, August 22nd from 10 AM to 12 PM
The Harvest Celebration of Motherpatch, a new public art project by Fallen Fruit .

There was free watermelons for EVERYONE in York, a watermelon race, seed spitting contest. and we wrote down memories and advice we got from our MOTHERS. Everyone was encouraged to ‘Spit your seeds’ so that watermelons will continue to grow throughout York!

Motherpatch is the largest public watermelon patch in the world, containing over 30 global varieties of watermelons. The project is Fallen Fruit’s collaboration with the CCA and the people of Sumter County that began in 2012, and has unfolded through ongoing conversation, creation and collaboration.

This event was made possible by funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Visual Artists Network/National Performance Network, ArtPlace America, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Daniel Foundation of Alabama and the generous contributions of our individual sponsors.

Fallen Fruit ®
photos by ©Fallen Fruit

Fallen Fruit is an art collaboration originally conceived in 2004 by David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. Since 2013, David and Austin have continued the collaborative work.

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Join us! Motherpatch! Coleman Center for the Arts.

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Please join us at the Coleman Center for the Arts (CCA) outside on Avenue A on Saturday, August 22nd from 10 AM to 12 PM for the Harvest Celebration of Motherpatch, a new public art project by the Fallen Fruit.

Activities will include free watermelons for all (while supplies last,) a watermelon race (with prizes!!), and music!! Please also join us in sharing memories and advice you got from your mother, as we honor mothers with these delicious seeded watermelons!

This event is free and open to the public! All are welcome! Free watermelons! Free food! Free fun! Come and join us and remember to “Spit your seeds!”

Motherpatch is the largest public watermelon patch in the world, containing over 30 global varieties of watermelons. The project is Fallen Fruit’s collaboration with the CCA and the people of Sumter County that began in 2012, and has unfolded through ongoing conversation, creation and collaboration.

This event is made possible by funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Visual Artists Network/National Performance Network, ArtPlace America, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Daniel Foundation of Alabama and the generous contributions of our individual sponsors.


COLEMAN CENTER for the arts 630 Avenue A York, AL 36925 205.392.2005
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